Legends & Losers - Raging Against Business BS Since 2017

Legends & Losers - Raging Against Business BS Since 2017 header image 1

092: Kim Scott on Radical Candor, Results & How Good Praise Challenges Us to Do Better Work

What’s it like to pitch the founders of Google? How does it feel when Sheryl Sandberg informs you that you sound stupid? What does it mean to be radically candid? Here are the three things we learned from Kim Scott on using radical candor to raise performance, lead our teams more effectively, and set high standards.

"Radical candor gets measured not at your mouth, but at the other person’s ear." - Kim Scott

3 Things We Learned:

Radical candor can change the course of your life.

Sheryl Sandberg’s intervention set Kim on a new course, hiring a speech coach and even laying the foundation for what she now travels all over the world speaking, writing and training on - radical candor. If Sheryl hadn’t intervened, Kim probably would never have realized how she was showing up in pitches or public speaking, and her career and business would have been limited as a result. Radical candor means truly doing and saying what’s best for the person, not just keeping the peace.

People in larger organizations exaggerate risk.

People are often more concerned with their reputation than results. When you start to show up with radical candor, 9 out of 10 times the response will be positive. But that 10th time you might get a negative response. People in big companies often overreact out of fear of the downside and forget about the upside of radical candor. Follow the example of companies like Apple and Google. Worry about your reputation less, and focus more on leading people to deliver results.

Good praise challenges us to do better.

Praise is much more than a way to show we care personally. Good praise challenges us to do good work, shows others what success looks like and encourages us to come up to that level. On the flip side, criticism is also unfairly associated with direct challenge, without the element of care. That’s why the Shit Sandwich doesn’t work, it only results in bad praise and bad criticism. Radical candor means helping people raise their performance, setting the bar higher and encouraging them to meet that higher standard.

Radical candor takes emotional discipline. Most people who start to show up with radical candor in their business conversations find themselves backing down when the other person gets upset. But is that what’s best for them, and especially our team, who are accountable to deliver results? Rather than backing down from the challenge, it’s time to step up on the personal caring dimension. Emphasize that your criticism is for a purpose - to challenge them to a higher standard, and support them to meet that standard.

Guest Bio

Kim Scott is the author of the NYT & WSJ bestseller Radical Candor: Be a Kickass Boss without Losing your Humanity. Kim led AdSense, YouTube, and Doubleclick Online Sales and Operations at Google and then joined Apple to develop and teach a leadership seminar. Kim has been a CEO coach at Dropbox, Qualtrics, Twitter, and several other tech companies.

Previously, Kim was the co-founder and CEO of Juice Software, a collaboration start-up, and led business development at Delta Three and Capital Thinking. Earlier in her career, she worked as a senior policy advisor at the FCC, managed a pediatric clinic in Kosovo, started a diamond cutting factory in Moscow, and was an analyst on the Soviet Companies Fund and has written three novels. Lean more at radicalcandor.com, and follow Kim on Twitter @kimballscott.

00:0000:00

091: Hal Elrod on Overcoming Cancer, the 5 Minute Rule, & Achieving Level 10 Success

You’ve already survived a horrific car accident that literally stopped your heart for 6 minutes. You broke 11 bones. Doctors said you’d never walk again. Not only did you walk again, you ran a 52-mile ultra-marathon. Flash forward, and you’ve just been diagnosed with a very rare, very aggressive form of leukemia. How do you handle that moment of truth?  Here are three things we learned from the irrepressible Hal Elrod, international keynote speaker and #1 best-selling author of The Miracle Morning, on personal development, achievement and overcoming incredible adversity.

When I was diagnosed, I called my wife first. That was a hard call to make. Hal Elrod

3 Things We Learned 

Follow the 5 Minute Rule for Negativity

When Hal was diagnosed, he recalled the advice of a mentor. Allow yourself 5 minutes to be upset, then let go and move on. Hal decided, “I’m going to be the happiest, most grateful person I could be, as I go through cancer, versus feeling sorry for myself or letting fear run my life.”

In Times of Adversity, Get Outside Perspective

When things start to spiral downward, it’s easy to feel out of control and decide that we’ve failed. Depression can even turn our minds off to creative solutions. In those times, it’s critical to gain perspective from people who can see what we can’t. Hal recalled going through the economic crash, where he turned to Jon Berghoff for perspective. Jon brought it with one powerful question, ‘Are you exercising every day? If you’re not putting yourself in peak physical, mental and emotional state through exercise every day, you’re not going to think better thoughts that will move you forward.’ Hal revealed, “The Miracle Morning really started with Jon telling me to go for a run in the morning.”

To Achieve More, BECOME More

We all want “Level 10” success, but are we willing to develop ourselves to reach that level? On Hal’s very first run, he heard the Jim Rohn quote that would change his life, “Your level of success will rarely exceed your level of personal development.” We think the key to achieving more is doing more. But it’s really about becoming more. Hal explained, “When you become more, you have the ability to achieve more with less effort...I realized I have to dedicate time to my level of personal development every day, so I become a Level 10 person.”

The way you start your day sets the tone for the day you create, and ultimately the life you create. If you look at the average person, most people go through their days undisciplined, unfocused and not living the life of their dreams. If you have a focused, growth-oriented and goal-oriented morning, you’re becoming a growth-oriented, goal-oriented person, who can apply that to every level of your life.

Guest Bio

Hal Elrod is on a mission to elevate the consciousness of humanity, one morning at a time. As one of the highest rated keynote speakers in the world, creator of one of the fastest growing and most engaged online communities in existence and author of one of the bestselling books on Amazon, The Miracle Morning—which has been translated into 27 languages, has over 2,000 five-star Amazon reviews and is practiced daily by over 500,000 people in 70+ countries—he is doing exactly that.

Hal actually died at age 20. Hit head-on by a drunk driver at 70 miles per hour, his heart stopped for 6 minutes, he broke 11 bones and was told by doctors that he would never walk again. Not only did Hal walk, he went on to run a 52-mile ultramarathon. Then, in November of 2016, Hal nearly died again—his kidneys, lungs, and heart of the verge of failing, which led to his being diagnosed with a very rare, very aggressive form of leukemia.

After enduring the most difficult year of his life, Hal is now cancer-free and furthering his mission as the Executive Producer of The Miracle Morning MOVIE—a documentary featuring Lewis Howes, Brendon Burchard, Mel Robbins, Robin Sharma, Robert Kiyosaki, Vishen Lakhiani, Laila Ali, James Altucher, Pat Flynn, John Lee Dumas, Marci Schimoff, Dr. John Gray, Joe Polish, and more.

Learn more at http://halelrod.com/.

00:0000:00

090: Matt Straz on Supporting NYC After 9/11, Building Beautiful Software & Differentiating on Experience

The best innovators are the people who are experiencing a problem. What’s the connection between legendary founders and passion? What is the difference between finding investors on the East and West Coast? After cash flow, what is the next thing companies have to care about? Here are the three top things we learned from Matt Straz of Namely.

The only person in the company that’s expected or hopes to scale infinitely is the founder. -Matt Straz

3 Things We Learned  

There’s a correlation between legendary founders and inexperience

When you unpack legendary innovators and entrepreneurs, they are the people experiencing the problem. Passion around the problem is the real thing that makes them unstoppable, not experience in the space. The entrepreneur that has the pain and the insight, is capable of way more than someone who knows all about the space.

At a certain point, people and talent start to get more important than financials.

When a company has between 10 and 50 employees, cashflow is king. Your finance system is your major and primary system of record because you have to stay in business. Once you get over a certain size, it’s actually the talent that will decide how much bigger you will grow.

Without the ability to measure the data, and evaluate performance you can’t be sure you have the best talent.

In every company, almost everyone is supposed to get on and off at a different point

The people you work with can only scale to a certain amount, so it’s normal for people to get on and off the bus because they are more tuned to one stage than the other. The only problem with people is that getting off the bus makes them angry, but we should accept that businesses go through stages. If we are all self-actualized we won’t take offense, because we are clear on our strengths and weaknesses.  

What makes the most impact is having passion around a problem and finding its solution. The entrepreneur that has the pain and the insight will go further than someone who knows everything about industry. The world needs more entrepreneurs who bring a new energy, and this expands our world, because if there are no entrepreneurs there’s no economic or innovation growth. We should be self-actualized enough to know what our strengths and weaknesses are and know that the people who get a company off the ground won’t usually be the same people to scale it. Remember that leaders are evaluated by the talent around them.

Guest Bio

Matt Straz is the founder and CEO of Namely, the HR and payroll platform for the world's most exciting companies. Go to http://www.namely.com/ for more information and find him on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattstraz/.

00:0000:00

089: Beat Them to the Punch: Former UFC Middleweight Champion Luke Rockhold on Tunnel Vision Focus, Building World Class Skills & Recovering from Defeat

What’s it like to step into the octagon in front of tens of thousands to defend your world title? How do you bounce back after devastating defeat? How do you focus and train every day for just 2 or 3 performances in a year? Here are three things we learned from former UFC Middleweight Champion and two-time world champion mixed martial artist, Luke Rockhold.

"We don’t have quarters, we don’t have another inning. We have to show up and everything has to be perfect. No mistakes." - Luke Rockhold

Take Time Away in Order To Grow Faster

As much as Luke dedicates himself in training for each fight, he still takes the time to get out of the gym on a regular basis. “I grew up in Santa Cruz, so I enjoy the outdoors,” Luke explained. “So I have to get out of the gym. For me, my time away from the gym gives me perspective and fuels the fire, so when I go back in the gym I can absorb more information.” Luke pointed out that fighters who don’t leave the gym often plateau, unable to process all the new information being thrown at them with fresh eyes and a fresh mind.

Test Yourself Against the Best

Luke has consistently trained with two of the best fighters of all time, Cain Velasquez and Daniel Cormier, going toe to toe with them in the gym every day. He also tests himself by taking on the best fighter in any gym he walks into around the world. Testing yourself against the best forces you to focus more deeply, increase your speed and grow your skills faster.

Create the Space to Attack

In mixed martial arts, inches can be the difference between victory and defeat. Luke gives an example from his ‘ground game’ skillset, “Every inch you can create distance, you can create that much more velocity in your shots.” So Luke works on this aspect of his skillset consistently, turning it into a major advantage. Often opponents cannot “feel” him like they’re accustomed to, and Luke is able to land shots they don’t expect.

In a world where many fighters never come back from a major defeat, how do you come back stronger and reclaim your place? According to Luke, the key to bouncing back is to stay confident in yourself. Put the defeat behind you and refuse to fight scared. “If you hesitate for one second, the other guy’s going to beat you to the punch. Unexplainable things happen in fighting, but in that cage it’s a different world. You have to let go and have confidence that you’re going to beat them to the punch.”

Guest Bio

Luke Rockhold is a mixed martial artist and former UFC Middleweight Champion. A two-time world champion, Rockhold has been ranked the #2 middleweight and #12 official pound-for-pound fighter by the UFC and other publications like Fight Matrix and Sherdog. A native of Santa Cruz, CA, Luke is also an avid surfer and skateboarder.

00:0000:00

088: How Jeff Hoffman Became A Billionaire Entrepreneur Who Makes a GIANT Difference

Why is entrepreneurship so critical for young people in our world? According to Jeff Hoffman, billionaire and serial entrepreneur, it’s because the heart of entrepreneurship is problem solving. Jeff believes the key to having the life you dream of is being an effective problem solver. “If you can solve a problem in the world, you become valuable to the world.” Here are 3 things we learned from Jeff on getting results, why entrepreneurship matters, and how to earn the right to enjoy your life.

Entrepreneurship is not the goal, it’s the toolset. Jeff Hoffman

Why is entrepreneurship so critical for young people in our world? According to Jeff Hoffman, serial entrepreneur and billionaire founder of Priceline.com, it’s because the heart of entrepreneurship is problem solving. Jeff believes the key to having the life you dream of is being an effective problem solver. “If you can solve a problem in the world, you become valuable to the world.” Here are 3 things we learned from Jeff on getting results, why entrepreneurship matters, and how to earn the right to enjoy your life.

Write Your Own Funeral Summary

After a difficult time in which he lost several people very close to him, Jeff started to ask himself, “If today was my funeral, what would the summary be? What would I want people to say if this was my funeral right now?” Jeff knew he wanted to be known more for making an impact than for the businesses he started. These 2 questions drove the point home - he needed to get busy. “For whatever the rest of my time is here in this life, I want to spend as much of it trying to teach people a skillset that will improve their lives.”

Earn the Right to Enjoy Your Life

You are not entitled to a comfortable, happy life. You have to go out and earn it by building something worthwhile. “You gotta earn it first. My focus was always, let’s get something done. And when it’s done and we can proud of it, then let’s enjoy it. You earn the right to be someone in a good mood because you’ve paid your dues.”

The Only Thing That Matters is Results

“I love being around winners,” Jeff said, “People who just find a way to get it done and stop complaining about it.” One of the reasons Jeff enjoyed running travel businesses is his belief that travel is the enemy of prejudice. The more we get to know other groups, other cultures, other perspectives, the more open-minded we become. This leads to focusing on the right things. “When I hire people, I never see race, ethnicity, gender, age or any of those things. I see only one thing...contribution.

Whenever you find yourself saying, “I wish they would fix that!” stop yourself and remember, “There is no THEY.” Focus on your solving problems, not on being busy. Jeff points out, “You can be as passionate and determined about winning as you want, but if you don’t go out there and actually outscore the other guys, it doesn’t matter.”

Guest Bio

Jeff Hoffman is a successful entrepreneur, proven CEO, worldwide motivational speaker, published author, film producer, and a producer of a Grammy-winning jazz album in 2015. In addition to founding multiple startups, Jeff has served as CEO of both public and private companies, as well as as a senior executive in many capacities. Jeff has been part of a number of well-known companies, including Priceline.com. uBid.com, ColorJar, and more. Jeff is a frequent keynote speaker, having been invited to speak in over 50 countries, on the topics of innovation, entrepreneurship, and business leadership. He is the co-author of the book SCALE, and a featured business expert seen on Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, CNN International, Bloomberg News, CNBC, ABC, and NPR, and in publications including Forbes, Inc., Time, Fast Company, the Wall Street Journal, and more.

 

 

00:0000:00

086: One Man’s Journey From Murder Conviction to Mentor & Leader - Will Little - Part 1

We all have moments of truth in our lives. For some, it’s a moment of self-discovery. A time to stay true to ourselves. For others, our moment of truth becomes a turning point, where we choose to transform ourselves into something more. For Will Little, the first moment of truth came when he was sentenced to prison for 3rd degree murder, at a time when his girlfriend was 2 weeks pregnant with his first child. The second came the day he left prison, where he had a choice between staying true to himself or slipping back into his old lifestyle. Here are the 3 things we learned from Will Little on personal transformation, the power of purpose, and how to handle your moment of truth.

 

"The streets lied to me." - Will Little

You May Not Control Your Circumstances, But You Always Control Your Response

When Will was sentenced, he chose not to be a victim. “I wanted to become a man, even though I never had an example of a man in my life...My whole mission was to do positive things.” Instead of following the example of the inmates around him, Will determined that he would not be ruled by his environment. ”When I began to transform my life,” Will explained, “I started reading more in prison and educating myself, and I just started thinking differently.” As part of his self-education, Will completed his GED, read books and speeches, studied Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and even studied the dictionary to expand his vocabulary.

The Only Way To Know If You’ve Truly Changed is to be Tested

As Will transformed his character, he focused on controlling his anger in the moment. Will traces his anger issues back to the lack of mentors and role models in his childhood, “My anger came from living in the world and not knowing what to do. I was really alone the whole time during my childhood.” After one key incident in prison, in which he averted a violent altercation with a prison gang leader through a short conversation, Will resolved that he would stop and think more logically in heated moments. But Will points out that “You never really know you’ve changed until you’re tested.” Whether it’s someone cutting us off in traffic or trying to start a fight, it’s in those times that we truly learn about ourselves and our level of self-control.

Once You Have Transformed Yourself, You Can Choose to Never Go Back

Prison conditions have improved to the point where the threat of returning to prison isn’t much of a deterrent for many former inmates. On top of that, with Wall Street getting into the prison business, a whole cottage industry has sprung up in which everyone benefits from overflowing prisons except the inmates. So rather than focusing on rehabilitating inmates, the prison system keeps the gravy train running and inmates often end up right back in prison. Will refused to be a statistic again. “I knew the day I walked out of that prison, and took that last look at the prison walls and the mountains, that I was never coming back. And I would do anything in my means not to come back.”

We all have a purpose, and it’s our job to discover it, then go out and do it. When referring to his second chance at freedom, Will explains, “I had a purpose. Once I discovered that purpose, God knew I would do that...mainly to teach people how to live life, for those who didn’t know how to navigate our way.” Today Will Little is an inspiring example of determination, personal transformation and the power of purpose.

Guest Bio

Will Little is a former gang member and convicted murderer turned youth mentor and public speaker. Transforming himself over the course of 10 years in prison, Will became a devout Muslim and a model prisoner. Based in Philadelphia, Will now speaks to businesses and nonprofits such as 1Life Fully Lived while mentoring at-risk youths around the city.

00:0000:00

087: One Man’s Journey From Murder Conviction to Mentor & Leader - Will Little Part 2

Welcome back to Part 2 of this legendary dialogue with Will Little, gang member and convicted murderer turned youth mentor and public speaker. Will's first moment of truth came when he was sentenced to prison for 3rd degree murder, at a time when his girlfriend was 2 weeks pregnant with his first child. The second came the day he left prison, where he had a choice between staying true to himself or slipping back into his old lifestyle. Here are the 3 things we learned from Will Little on personal transformation, the power of purpose, and how to handle your moment of truth.

 

"I had a purpose. Once I discovered that purpose...mainly to teach people how to live life, for those who didn’t know how to navigate our way." - Will Little

You May Not Control Your Circumstances, But You Always Control Your Response

When Will was sentenced, he chose not to be a victim. “I wanted to become a man, even though I never had an example of a man in my life...My whole mission was to do positive things.” Instead of following the example of the inmates around him, Will determined that he would not be ruled by his environment. ”When I began to transform my life,” Will explained, “I started reading more in prison and educating myself, and I just started thinking differently.” As part of his self-education, Will completed his GED, read books and speeches, studied Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and even studied the dictionary to expand his vocabulary.

The Only Way To Know If You’ve Truly Changed is to be Tested

As Will transformed his character, he focused on controlling his anger in the moment. Will traces his anger issues back to the lack of mentors and role models in his childhood, “My anger came from living in the world and not knowing what to do. I was really alone the whole time during my childhood.” After one key incident in prison, in which he averted a violent altercation with a prison gang leader through a short conversation, Will resolved that he would stop and think more logically in heated moments. But Will points out that “You never really know you’ve changed until you’re tested.” Whether it’s someone cutting us off in traffic or trying to start a fight, it’s in those times that we truly learn about ourselves and our level of self-control.

Once You Have Transformed Yourself, You Can Choose to Never Go Back

Prison conditions have improved to the point where the threat of returning to prison isn’t much of a deterrent for many former inmates. On top of that, with Wall Street getting into the prison business, a whole cottage industry has sprung up in which everyone benefits from overflowing prisons except the inmates. So rather than focusing on rehabilitating inmates, the prison system keeps the gravy train running and inmates often end up right back in prison. Will refused to be a statistic again. “I knew the day I walked out of that prison, and took that last look at the prison walls and the mountains, that I was never coming back. And I would do anything in my means not to come back.”Today Will Little is an inspiring example of determination, personal transformation and the power of purpose.

Guest Bio

Will Little is a former gang member and convicted murderer turned youth mentor and public speaker. Transforming himself over the course of 10 years in prison, Will became a devout Muslim and a model prisoner. Based in Philadelphia, Will now speaks to businesses and nonprofits such as 1Life Fully Lived while mentoring at-risk youths around the city.

00:0000:00

085: Relentless: How Joe De Sena Built Spartan Race into the Category King of Obstacle Racing

What’s it like to stare down 300 competitors and build a legendary company in an exploding category? For endurance athlete and entrepreneur Joe De Sena, it was a challenge he met with the same relentless tenacity that compelled him to run the Iditarod (and we mean run, as in no dogs, no sleds). Here are the 3 things we learned from Joe, starting with his first business cleaning pools for New York mobsters, to losing a half million dollars on his first obstacle event, to building a global brand with over 1 million participants a year.

I think I’m actually normal, everyone else is abnormal. - Joe De Sena

One Sentence Can Change Your Life 

One of Joe’s turning points came early in life while watching his mother buy a new car. As they stood in the Chevy dealership, he eyed the BMW’s next door. “I said, I want one of those. My mom turned to me and said, ‘You gotta work. If you work, you get one of those.’ That one sentence was like a vice grip on my head that would transform my life.” Joe explained that from that point on, he defined himself as a worker, and soon started the pool business in which he learned his first real entrepreneurial lessons. That business grew to over 700 customers, of which Joe estimates some 200 were members of New York crime families.

Overcome Rejection Early Because Everything Is Selling

Joe puts such a high value on overcoming rejection early in life that he encourages and funds his children’s entrepreneurial ventures, such as selling t-shirts on the beach. When people ask him why he put his kids through that, or why he would allow them to hound other parents with their sales pitch, Joe’s response is insightful. “I want them to get rejected 5,000 times, and figure out what they said differently that got the guy to buy that shirt. Because you’re going to be selling your whole life. You’re always going to be selling.

When You’re Relentless, Even the Pope Can’t Stop You 

The same relentless mentality that attracted Joe to endurance racing still serves the business side of Spartan Race today. Joe and his team once arrived for an event in Italy, only to discover they had been shut down by the Pope himself. Turns out their race area had been cordoned off for a ceremony anointing a new saint. Joe described their grueling setup process, “We are a mini-city in a way, and we have 7 days to do it, we have 5 tractor-trailers that roll in. It’s a serious project.” They had to wait out the shutdown, but Joe and his team pulled off the event successfully, compressing 7 days of setup into just 14 hours.

Joe is the ultimate example of years of hard work culminating in an “overnight success.” After Joe’s first event cost him half a million dollars and nearly cost one event worker his life, Spartan Race is in 35 countries, running 275 events with 1 million + participants worldwide. Along the way they’ve had to face 300 competitors in a category that has exploded in popularity. Superior funding, execution and marketing prowess have all contributed to the success, but at the heart of Spartan Race is Joe himself and the relentless mentality that drives him.

Guest Bio

Joe De Sena is the Founder and CEO of Spartan Race, Inc, the world’s leading obstacle racing company. An accomplished athlete, Joe has competed in every extreme sports adventure he could find, racing more than 50 ultra-distance events in his athletic career. Learn more at https://www.spartan.com/en.


Download the latest episodes, subscribe and review Legends & Losers on iTunes. Then go out and #BeLegendary

 

00:0000:00

084: Relentless: How Joe De Sena Built Spartan Race into the Category King of Obstacle Racing

What’s it like to stare down 300 competitors and build a legendary company in an exploding category? For endurance athlete and entrepreneur Joe De Sena, it was a challenge he met with the same relentless tenacity that compelled him to run the Iditarod (and we mean run, as in no dogs, no sleds). Here are the 3 things we learned from Joe, starting with his first business cleaning pools for New York mobsters, to losing a half million dollars on his first obstacle event, to building a global brand with over 1 million participants a year.

I think I’m actually normal, everyone else is abnormal. - Joe De Sena

One Sentence Can Change Your Life 

One of Joe’s turning points came early in life while watching his mother buy a new car. As they stood in the Chevy dealership, he eyed the BMW’s next door. “I said, I want one of those. My mom turned to me and said, ‘You gotta work. If you work, you get one of those.’ That one sentence was like a vice grip on my head that would transform my life.” Joe explained that from that point on, he defined himself as a worker, and soon started the pool business in which he learned his first real entrepreneurial lessons. That business grew to over 700 customers, of which Joe estimates some 200 were members of New York crime families.

Overcome Rejection Early Because Everything Is Selling

Joe puts such a high value on overcoming rejection early in life that he encourages and funds his children’s entrepreneurial ventures, such as selling t-shirts on the beach. When people ask him why he put his kids through that, or why he would allow them to hound other parents with their sales pitch, Joe’s response is insightful. “I want them to get rejected 5,000 times, and figure out what they said differently that got the guy to buy that shirt. Because you’re going to be selling your whole life. You’re always going to be selling.

When You’re Relentless, Even the Pope Can’t Stop You 

The same relentless mentality that attracted Joe to endurance racing still serves the business side of Spartan Race today. Joe and his team once arrived for an event in Italy, only to discover they had been shut down by the Pope himself. Turns out their race area had been cordoned off for a ceremony anointing a new saint. Joe described their grueling setup process, “We are a mini-city in a way, and we have 7 days to do it, we have 5 tractor-trailers that roll in. It’s a serious project.” They had to wait out the shutdown, but Joe and his team pulled off the event successfully, compressing 7 days of setup into just 14 hours.

Joe is the ultimate example of years of hard work culminating in an “overnight success.” After Joe’s first event cost him half a million dollars and nearly cost one event worker his life, Spartan Race is in 35 countries, running 275 events with 1 million + participants worldwide. Along the way they’ve had to face 300 competitors in a category that has exploded in popularity. Superior funding, execution and marketing prowess have all contributed to the success, but at the heart of Spartan Race is Joe himself and the relentless mentality that drives him.

Guest Bio

Joe De Sena is the Founder and CEO of Spartan Race, Inc, the world’s leading obstacle racing company. An accomplished athlete, Joe has competed in every extreme sports adventure he could find, racing more than 50 ultra-distance events in his athletic career. Learn more at https://www.spartan.com/en.


Download the latest episodes, subscribe and review Legends & Losers on iTunes. Then go out and #BeLegendary

 

00:0000:00

083: Creativity Rules: Stanford Professor Tina Seelig on Framestorming, Starting Small & How to Encourage Creativity

What does it take to solve big problems? What if we don’t consider ourselves creative? How do we get un-stuck when we finally get a BIG idea? We sat down with Dr Tina Seelig, Stanford professor, best-selling author and creativity expert, to find out how to encourage our natural creativity and problem-solving ability. Here are the three things we learned from this legendary leader.

Creativity is a natural state, but our school and work systems beat creativity out of us as children. - Dr Tina Seelig

Creativity Is Our Natural State

Some people are naturally more creative than others, just like athletes. Michael Jordan is a great example of someone who overcame a lack of physical gifts with sheer hard work. Children start off with incredible creativity. Creativity is a natural state, but our school and work systems beats creativity out of us as children. All we have to do is reshape and reframe our environment to encourage creativity instead of squashing it.

Framestorm Before You Brainstorm

It’s very easy to get attached to a particular approach to solving a problem. One of the biggest missed opportunities in problem solving is reframing. Dr Seelig explained, “I’m a big fan of framestorming. Framestorm before you brainstorm.” Fall in love with the problem first, and brainstorm different “frames” for the problem before you start brainstorming solutions. We can even practice framestorming in our everyday life. “I keep reminding myself, when people are doing something that doesn’t make sense to me...I’m going to assume the best as opposed to the worst.”

When You Have a Big Idea, Do Something Little

When people have a big idea, they often get bogged down with the question, “What do I do now?” Dr Seelig’s advice is to do something very small. Just take the first step. Do tiny little experiments to see if you’re heading in the right direction. When one of your little experiments goes well, it gives you the energy for bigger experiments and bigger steps toward your big idea. 

Some people look at the world as one right answer, where certain pieces fit in a certain place to produce a certain result. But one piece goes missing, and puzzle-builders get stuck. On the other hand, quilt-makers define success for themselves, start small, and if there’s a missing piece, they fill it in with something else and keep moving toward their goal. As a result, those with a quilt-maker mindset become much more successful. Be a quilt-maker, not a puzzle-builder.

Guest Bio

Dr. Tina Seelig is an award-winning educator and best-selling author of 17 books, including her latest, Creativity Rules. Dr Seelig is Professor of the Practice in the Department of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) at Stanford University. She is also a faculty director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), the entrepreneurship center at Stanford University's School of Engineering. Dr Seelig has received the SVForum Visionary Award, the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering,  the 2014 MS&E Award for Graduate Teaching, the 2008 National Olympus Innovation Award, and the 2005 Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Download the latest episodes, subscribe and review Legends & Losers on iTunes. Then go out and #BeLegendary

00:0000:00