Legends & Losers - The Podcast Silicon Valley Needs

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052: How John Lee Dumas Built Entrepreneur On Fire Into A Legendary Podcast

Why is it so necessary to add value on a consistent basis? What lessons can we learn about freedom and mastery? What is the right way to look at the path to success? On this episode, we are joined by the legendary podcaster John Lee Dumas, who imparts his wisdom on building a life of your dreams.

Try not to become a person of success but rather a person of value. -John Lee Dumas

3 Things We Learned From John Lee Dumas

Every Master Was A Disaster

We don’t become legends overnight, in fact we often have to face being losers before we can graduate to our greatest successes. John now has over 1500 interviews with some of the greatest entrepreneurs in the world, but he had to start somewhere. Where we start isn’t usually as glamorous as where we end up. Even the greats had to learn.

Be a Person of Value

Success and value aren’t a package deal, and the most life changing thing that can happen is realizing the power of being a person who leads with value. If you can empower someone else, or bring some light into their world, that is way more important than having all the trappings of success. If you’re lucky, being valuable will bring success.

Movements Start with One

Every person we look up to, from speakers to popular podcasters didn’t start with hundreds of thousands of followers. They started with one person who believed in them so much they spread the word. Don’t let the lack of a tribe stop you from starting something, because if you add value to one person, more will come.

Takeaways

  1. You don’t have to see the full staircase to take that next step.
  2. Don’t confuse money with freedom, one doesn’t guarantee the other.
  3. Movements start with one person.

On this episode we discussed;

  • The power of adding value on a consistent basis
  • Why you need to be a person of value
  • Creating your dream life one step at a time
  • Building an audience one person at a time
  • The power of taking that first step

A lot of people can’t start something until they’ve seen the finish line, and that freezes them in place, stopping them from even taking that first step. Remember, when you take that first step the fog will lift slowly and you’ll find yourself at the top!

Guest Bio

John Lee Dumas is the founder & host of the top ranked Podcast Entrepreneurs On FIRE, where he interviews today’s most inspiring Entrepreneurs 7 days a week! Go to EOFire.com for more information.

 

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051: Silicon Valley Venture Capital Young Guns - Matt Miller & Pat Grady of Sequoia Capital

Being successful in business relies on resilience, passion and good ideas. What else makes a good entrepreneur? Does being a successful CEO require a solid business background? Where is that coveted stairway to success and is it really quite so straightforward? These are just a few of the questions answered by Pat Grady and Matt Miller, experts in discovering top-notch business ideas as partners in Sequoia.

The best businesses are, for the most part, people who experienced the problem, hated the problem, didn't understand why the problem hadn't been solved before, and just made it their mission to go out and change it. - Pat Grady

Takeaways

  1. Not having a traditional business background isn't always a drawback as companies look for people from all walks of life to invest in.
  2. Creating restrictions banishes creativity - an open mind will discover the CEOs who will bring innovation with them.
  3. There's no recipe for being a successful entrepreneur, you just have to rely on authenticity and your passion for solving a particular problem.

First, Pat and Matt talked about Sequoia and explained Donald Valentine's unique approach and outlook towards business development and venture capital. They then also talked about their own backgrounds and the work they do within Sequoia. Pat and Matt also discussed some of their favorite projects they've been involved in it and their thoughts regarding the future of technology and what this might mean for the big category kings in business. We also touched on the correlation between the growth of the business and the speed of innovation - using the "Big Five" as an example. Finally, we spoke about the importance and resilience of microservices and how they benefit companies big and small.

We also discussed;

  • How a diverse, interesting background can make a successful CEO
  • The unique change of generations within Sequoia
  • How to start feeling comfortable when we're uncomfortable
  • The secret to Sequoia's success
  • Why it’s better to focus on one project than spread yourself thin
  • Up-and-coming amazing categories

Authenticity is a key selling point for any business - it's not just about shoving your product in the faces of customers, it's making your product into an efficient magnet and then customers will want to be near it. You shouldn't allow yourself the luxury of whiplash as technology develops at amazing speeds but rather you should move along to keep up with it the best you can. That will only make innovation easier. Remember that there's no real, straightforward recipe for business success. The ingredients are fairly simple, however it's down to you as an ambitious business owner to figure out how they best fit together and when to utilize them. Ultimately, no category leader is reinventing the wheel; following your creativity, passion and knowledge for the problem you want to solve with your product will put you straight on the path to success.

Guest Bio

Pat Grady has been a Sequoia partner for ten years. He has graduated from Boston College and his scholarship was funded, partly, by Sequoia investments which signifies the importance of Sequoia's mission for Pat. He was a roofer in high school and during college and his first post-grad job was with inside sales, which he excelled at. Pat believes that every business is unique on its own and has a chance of becoming part of the wider context for the future. Read more about Pat's vision at Sequoiacap.com/people/pat-grady

Matt Miller has been with Sequoia for five years and he has always gravitated towards a future or a career related to technology. His fascination with the world of venture capital started at a very early age and once he started writing software, he never really looked back. Matt believes that every experience can teach you a valuable lesson and his motto is that no company or individual is too boring for Sequoia. Find out more about Matt's work with Sequoia at Sequoiacap.com/people/matthew-miller

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050: Growth Hacking Market Categories w/ Eddie Yoon Part 2

Creativity that leads to category creation is always a very valuable skill when developing your business. Who do you market this category to? How do you identify the people who are most likely to be engaged in your category? What makes super consumers so important on the way to evangelizing your category? No problem will remain unsolved with this week's guest, legendary growth strategist and motivational speaker Eddie Yoon.

You're not born a super consumer, you evolve into one. That evolution of how you became one has a lot of richness and insight for what you can do to crack the code on it. - Eddie Yoon

Takeaways

  1. If you run a company and want to be a legendary category designer, become a super consumer of your OWN product first.
  2. Anybody who takes the time to post about your product on social media are most likely a super consumer. Know how to identify them so you can target them properly.
  3. When you frame the problem and the solution becomes apparent, this can be a very strong marketing strategy.
  4. Your brand is a direct function of your category and it's the category that builds the brand, not the other way around.

We started off the episode by explaining Eddie's concept of the super consumer and how companies and entrepreneurs need to be mission-driven and have an insight around the problem. Eddie also shared how the shift from being passionate about your business to turning it into a job or a career can make the creativity and spirit in a good company die. He then shared some tips from his book Super Consumers on how we can identify our best customer segment. We then mentioned a few specific examples on how engaging with your super consumers can help you grow within your category. Eddie then used an example to point out how localization can help you grow a new product in your brand and that's a typical feature of many category kings.

 

Eddie then shared his opinion on using agencies and other third party companies to build a network of influencers. Afterwards Eddie gave a few examples about super consumers in the unique category of power generators and how that also pushes them to be super consumers in other categories. We then discussed the relationship between a brand and a category. Eddie then talked about his background and what it was that set him on the path of success. This led to a bigger conversation about adversity and how to target this appropriately throughout your life. Eddie then talked about his career at the HBR and how that's helped his understanding of business and marketing. We then mentioned the role of coincidence and how being in the right place at the right time can work out for you - the way it worked out for Eddie when he wrote his first piece about super consumers. We also mentioned about the benefits of being humbling and trading ideas freely. Finally, we talked about what the future holds for Eddie.

We also talked about;

  • The five indicators of a super consumer
  • The importance of local density and generating super consumers
  • Framing your product on the way to evangelizing your category
  • Creating a new, successful market from variations of your product
  • Momentum generating through local cultures
  • Eddie's top three tips on developing and designing your category
  • Upbringing and childhood effects on future success
  • Cultivating respect towards competition and how generosity can help a business

Every successful company and every category king has a strong, unifying mission statement. If the mission is gone, then a business can no longer function. Make sure that your mission is crystal clear and evident in everything you do and then know the right people to market it to. Because that mission identifies the problem that your business, or even your category, is trying to solve and without it, consumers wouldn't even know that there is a problem in the first place. Some parts of your market will always be more dedicated than others - these are the super consumers. Know how to recognize them and how to communicate with them, because losing even one or two can mean the end of your business. Most brands will wholly rely on their super consumers to generate revenue. Always look local as well - a wealth of local experience and influence is the biggest step on the way to evangelizing your category. Recognize influencers and network with them, you can either do that yourself or there are some very good agencies that can facilitate that. Last but not least, remember to stay humble. Don't let success get to your head and remember what your roots are and where you came from. Collaboration is endlessly more valuable than competition and it brings more experience, not just to you, but also to the world of business in general.

Guest Bio

Eddie Yoon is a growth strategist who has helped $5B+ in profitable growth for brands, companies and categories. Eddie has a wealth of experience and has conducted significant research, produced writing and is a motivational speaker on the topic of Category Growth and Category Creation. Eddie's mission as a founder of his newfound company, Eddie Would Grow, is to gather, synthesize and share compelling growth stories to draw patterns, build frameworks, and help teams chart a course to greater growth and prosperity. Find out more about Eddie's vision at EddieWouldGrow.com or follow him on Twitter at Twitter.com/user/EddieWouldGrow.

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049: Growth Hacking Market Categories w/ Eddie Yoon Part 1

Creativity that leads to category creation is always a very valuable skill when developing your business. Who do you market this category to? How do you identify the people who are most likely to be engaged in your category? What makes super consumers so important on the way to evangelizing your category? No problem will remain unsolved with this week's guest, legendary growth strategist and motivational speaker Eddie Yoon.

You're not born a super consumer, you evolve into one. That evolution of how you became one has a lot of richness and insight for what you can do to crack the code on it. - Eddie Yoon

Takeaways

  1. If you run a company and want to be a legendary category designer, become a super consumer of your OWN product first.
  2. Anybody who takes the time to post about your product on social media are most likely a super consumer. Know how to identify them so you can target them properly.
  3. When you frame the problem and the solution becomes apparent, this can be a very strong marketing strategy.
  4. Your brand is a direct function of your category and it's the category that builds the brand, not the other way around.

We started off the episode by explaining Eddie's concept of the super consumer and how companies and entrepreneurs need to be mission-driven and have an insight around the problem. Eddie also shared how the shift from being passionate about your business to turning it into a job or a career can make the creativity and spirit in a good company die. He then shared some tips from his book Super Consumers on how we can identify our best customer segment. We then mentioned a few specific examples on how engaging with your super consumers can help you grow within your category. Eddie then used an example to point out how localization can help you grow a new product in your brand and that's a typical feature of many category kings.

 

Eddie then shared his opinion on using agencies and other third party companies to build a network of influencers. Afterwards Eddie gave a few examples about super consumers in the unique category of power generators and how that also pushes them to be super consumers in other categories. We then discussed the relationship between a brand and a category. Eddie then talked about his background and what it was that set him on the path of success. This led to a bigger conversation about adversity and how to target this appropriately throughout your life. Eddie then talked about his career at the HBR and how that's helped his understanding of business and marketing. We then mentioned the role of coincidence and how being in the right place at the right time can work out for you - the way it worked out for Eddie when he wrote his first piece about super consumers. We also mentioned about the benefits of being humbling and trading ideas freely. Finally, we talked about what the future holds for Eddie.

We also talked about;

  • The five indicators of a super consumer
  • The importance of local density and generating super consumers
  • Framing your product on the way to evangelizing your category
  • Creating a new, successful market from variations of your product
  • Momentum generating through local cultures
  • Eddie's top three tips on developing and designing your category
  • Upbringing and childhood effects on future success
  • Cultivating respect towards competition and how generosity can help a business

Every successful company and every category king has a strong, unifying mission statement. If the mission is gone, then a business can no longer function. Make sure that your mission is crystal clear and evident in everything you do and then know the right people to market it to. Because that mission identifies the problem that your business, or even your category, is trying to solve and without it, consumers wouldn't even know that there is a problem in the first place. Some parts of your market will always be more dedicated than others - these are the super consumers. Know how to recognize them and how to communicate with them, because losing even one or two can mean the end of your business. Most brands will wholly rely on their super consumers to generate revenue. Always look local as well - a wealth of local experience and influence is the biggest step on the way to evangelizing your category. Recognize influencers and network with them, you can either do that yourself or there are some very good agencies that can facilitate that. Last but not least, remember to stay humble. Don't let success get to your head and remember what your roots are and where you came from. Collaboration is endlessly more valuable than competition and it brings more experience, not just to you, but also to the world of business in general.

Guest Bio

Eddie Yoon is a growth strategist who has helped $5B+ in profitable growth for brands, companies and categories. Eddie has a wealth of experience and has conducted significant research, produced writing and is a motivational speaker on the topic of Category Growth and Category Creation. Eddie's mission as a founder of his newfound company, Eddie Would Grow, is to gather, synthesize and share compelling growth stories to draw patterns, build frameworks, and help teams chart a course to greater growth and prosperity. Find out more about Eddie's vision at EddieWouldGrow.com or follow him on Twitter at Twitter.com/user/EddieWouldGrow.

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048: LeBron James, Serena Williams & Cristiano Ronaldo Have Nothing On Blind Extreme Athlete Erik Weihenmayer Part 2

So much of what motivates us and demotivates us is happening way below the surface. How do we work slowly towards the courage it takes to make great things happen in our lives? How do we get ourselves out of the zoos of our own creation? What can we learn from animals about resilience? In this second part of our interview, Erik Weihenmayer shares more of his great story, and what keeps him going.

People are controlled by their fears rather than being driven by hope, and that can a dangerous place. -Erik Weihenmayer

Takeaways

  1. We associate happiness and aliveness with comfort, and we can get trapped in that zoo.
  2. There are three kinds of people, quitters, campers and climbers.
  3. You have to train yourself to have courage by practicing a bit of it every single day.

At the start of the show, Erik shared his workout regimen and how he makes sure he has balance. Next, he talked about constructing the business side of adventuring, and what it’s like for blind people in the working world. We also talked about how trauma affect us and gets in the way. Erik also talked about the danger of being in the comfort zone of our own lives. We talked about how to continue to innovate, explore, grow and feel purpose in our lives and challenge ourselves to do the things that matter. Towards the end of the show, we talked about the power of practicing courage.

Erik also spoke about;

  • The impact and legacy of Terry Fox
  • Quitters, campers and climbers
  • The resilience of animals
  • His definition of courage
  • The power of stepping into the storm of life

Bad things happen to people, and very often we take those things and create reasons and excuses around why life is bad. The trauma stops us from moving forward, and we end up getting crushed. Living in the storm of life is scary, and it throws you in all sorts of chaotic directions but remember the action is in the storm, that’s where discovery is, and that’s where insight is. Stop reacting, responding, and blaming, and just live with courage.

Guest Bio

Erik is an American athlete, adventurer, author, activist and motivational speaker, and the first blind person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, on May 25, 2001. He also completed the Seven Summits in September 2002, joining 150 mountaineers at the time who had accomplished that feat, but the only climber who was blind. In 2008 he also added Carstensz Pyramid in West Papua New Guinea, the tallest peak in Australasia, thus completing the more respected Seventh Summit. Weihenmayer has also made noteworthy climbs up the Nose of El Capitan in Yosemite in 1996, and ascended Losar, a 2700-foot vertical ice face in the Himalayas which he ascended in two days and 3 hours, in 2008. He is the author of Touch the Top of the World: A Blind Man's Journey to Climb Farther Than the Eye Can See, his memoir; and The Adversity Advantage, Turning Everyday Struggles into Everyday Greatness.

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047: LeBron James, Serena Williams & Cristiano Ronaldo Have Nothing On Blind Extreme Athlete Erik Weihenmayer Part 1

The primitive side of the brain makes us only focus on survival, and that can hold us back. How do you make sure you’re not letting your mind sabotage you? How do you find silence in your mind and live in stillness? What are the biggest challenges when it comes to climbing Everest? On this episode, we are joined by the legendary Erik Weihenmayer, who shares on creating the discipline to make your mind a beautiful, still stream.

The nature of mind is like water. If you do not disturb it, it becomes clear. -Erik Weihenmayer

Takeaways + Tactics

  1. PTSD isn’t a disorder, it’s a reaction the brain has to overwhelming circumstances.
  2. You have two sides to your brain, the rational brain and the primitive brain.
  3. Most accidents on climbs happen on the way down.
  4. Despite even the best circumstances, your brain is still going to try to lead you astray.

At the start of the show, Erik shared what it’s like to stand on top of the world and the importance of having stillness in your mind. We talked about the importance of knowing the right time and place to trust your brain. “The most relaxed fighter is the fighter who wins.” We also talked about team dynamics and why it’s so important for everyone to have the same mission. Towards the end of the show, Erik shared the experience of climbing Everest.

Erik also spoke about;

  • The two sides of your brain
  • The importance of launching yourself forward towards new discoveries
  • Why PTSD isn’t a disorder
  • Why preparation allows you to silence your brain

It takes a lot of practice and discipline to find that quiet place in your mind, but on the other side of that is peace and fulfillment. You have to learn to know your brain and be aware of when it’s sabotaging you and when you can listen to it. You need to talk down your brain when it’s sending you false signals. When you commit to something and you’re fully there, try to stay in that moment and be fully there, be hyper focused on what’s around you and don’t let the fear, doubt, and questioning sabotage the moment and what you should be feeling. Remember to keep your mind still like a mountain stream.

Guest Bio

Erik is an American athlete, adventurer, author, activist and motivational speaker, and the first blind person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, on May 25, 2001. He also completed the Seven Summits in September 2002, joining 150 mountaineers at the time who had accomplished that feat, but the only climber who was blind. In 2008 he also added Carstensz Pyramid in West Papua New Guinea, the tallest peak in Australasia, thus completing the more respected Seventh Summit. Weihenmayer has also made noteworthy climbs up the Nose of El Capitan in Yosemite in 1996, and ascended Losar, a 2700-foot vertical ice face in the Himalayas which he ascended in two days and 3 hours, in 2008. He is the author of Touch the Top of the World: A Blind Man's Journey to Climb Farther Than the Eye Can See, his memoir; and The Adversity Advantage, Turning Everyday Struggles into Everyday Greatness.

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046: Becoming a Millionaire Millennial with Entrepreneur Matt Aitchison

Being a successful entrepreneur can bring about a lot of benefits and generate a lot of profit. How can good mentorship help us break into a competitive field and create an entrepreneurial mindset? Can mistakes early in life set us back on our path? And if there's a mastermind in all of us, how can we utilize this on our way to success? Entrepreneurship guru and star of the Millionaire Mindcast Matt Aitchinson talks about this and much more, revealing the story of his own success and the best values an up and coming entrepreneur can harness to achieve success.

You have to weed your brain daily. You have to improve your environment daily. You have to be 1% better every single day. - Matt Aitchinson

Takeaways

  1. Being wealthy doesn't just mean having a lot of money - healthy relationships, a good community spirit and good health are also wealth on their own.
  2. Everybody makes mistakes, but how you respond to those mistakes is what defines your character.
  3. Set a goal to be better tomorrow than you were today or the day before. Always strive for continuous improvement.

We kicked off the show by talking about Matt's mentoring and how he sees himself as more of a mentor rather than a coach or a teacher. Matt then also talked about his background and the support he has received to leave his days of dangerous living behind. We also discussed how going to college could benefit you and create healthy habits in your everyday business life. Another point we made was that there are people who get into entrepreneurship for all the wrong reasons. Matt then talked about the success story of his own podcast. We also discussed the best communication practices and the importance of having an authentic dialogue. At the end, Matt and Chris talked about the significance of our mindset regarding money and the way a good or bad financial situation can affect your life.

We also talked about;

  • How your environment and the people you're with defines you
  • The issues with the work-life balance model
  • The appeal of entrepreneurship
  • Factors causing a decline in entrepreneurship in today's age
  • The importance of surrounding yourself with experienced mentors
  • How to stay focused on a goal but also enjoy the journey

Regardless of your start in life, there are always ways to redeem yourself and take your skillset to its full potential. Even if you make a mistake, it's important to readjust your mindset and surround yourself with the right people, who will motivate you and support your goals in life. Entrepreneurship is a good way to follow your dreams and knowing what you want to change about the world. Be honest about your motivations, whether financial or not, and get better at what you do. It's important to choose your mentors well. A mentor should have experience to show, not just a sound understanding of theory. Learning through mutual experience can be very enlightening.  

Guest Bio

Matt Aitchinson is the CEO and President of Vault Investment Properties, LLC. Based in Sacramento, Vault Investment Properties' mission is to redevelop housing via real estate investments and throughout the community. Matt is also the star of The Millionaire Mindcast, a podcast that can give you the knowledge necessary to take your entrepreneurial skills to their full potential. Matt's philosophy is pursuing legendary leadership which goes hand-in-hand with any strong, scalable organization. Find out more about Matt, The Millionaire Mindcast and his ideas at MattAitchison.com.

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045: Being a Legendary CMO: One Woman’s Silicon Valley Journey

The ultimate goal for many businesses in any sector is to be the category king - the one and only player in this particular niche. Is this an achievable goal? How can a good knowledge of category design help you stand out and develop your brand in full? And can you read someone's work habits by their shoes? Join Tenable CMO Jennifer "JJ" Johnson for her top insights on how knowing category design can put your business one step forward from your greatest competitors.

We all have moments where we're in a position to be our greatest self and we have hesitations around these moments. - Chris Lochhead

Takeaways

  1. Good knowledge of category design and category marketing is essential for a successful CMO career.
  2. Harnessing and understanding data is important, however it's essential for companies to know how to connect to people as well and bring about the personal touch.
  3. The values of the company matter - if your values don't match up with those of the company, you'll never be able to quite get it right.

We started off with JJ explaining how important it is for CMOs to focus on category design and how controlling your category can mean everything in business. We then talked more generally for company values - with mentions of Mercury, Uber, etc. - and how working for a company with contradicting values wouldn't result into anything productive. JJ also talked about how upbringing can influence your business mindset later in time and gave an example with her own upbringing. Then JJ also talked about her experience with Andreessen Horowtiz, one of the Silicon Valley market leaders, and how she moved on to a portfolio company afterwards. Finally, we talked about JJ's plans for the future and how she feels about what's coming up for her company in the next few years. We also mentioned the problems of the headstrong outlook of CEOs in the security technology space and how a fear of innovation can lead to companies losing their market lead to new competitors that were brave enough to take ownership of a new category.

We also discussed;

  •   Our favorite books about brand and category success
  •   The rise in popularity of category design
  •   Bringing stagnant categories back to life
  •   The importance of sincere and straightforward company values

Knowing how to best your competition is one of the toughest parts of running any business. Category design can help with that; at its core is the creativity and innovation to define your own niche in the market that you can dominate. But dominating a category also requires courage. Some big companies are too set in the values and ideas of their business' past that they risk being outperformed by newcomers with a lot more drive to try new things. Trendsetters belong in the present and future - that's why every CMO needs to be aware of the specifics of category design so that they can guide the business' brand in the right direction. Once the self-doubt is eliminated, it's a lot easier to think in a new direction and look to define your own category.

Guest Bio

Jennifer Johnson (JJ) is the first ever CMO for Tenable. JJ has experience in bringing innovation and creativity to company branding and stands behind the philosophy that category design is an essential skill for any CMO out there. Before Tenable, JJ was Tanium's first ever CMO, building one of the most influential brands in the cyber security and enterprise IT markets. JJ is also an advisor at Play Bigger, where she coaches and spreads the message about the importance of category design. She also worked for market leaders and category designers Andreessen Horowitz as a partner. Follow JJ on Twitter: Twitter.com/jj_cmo

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044: Modern Marketing, Artificial Intelligence & How to Promote Bob Marley’s Favorite Reggae Band

Good marketing relies on a faithful, relevant story that you can sell. But is that all there is to it? What makes big brands fail? How can you get your idea out there? Does artificial intelligence come in to the future of marketing? All these questions and more will be answered in this week's episode with marketing guru and founder of Double Loop Marketing Christian Sarkar.

The best advertising for an idea is that people will love it and steal it. - Christian Sarkar

Takeaways

  1. Good business marketing relies on a good story - and that story needs to be authentic and fall in line with the company's history.
  2. It's imperative to believe in the idea that your story represents and make sure to find the most efficient way to make that story be heard.
  3. Lead your category with both ideas AND products, because a product is, in itself, and idea that you need to sell as the best solution to a customer's problem.

To start off, we talked about how you can engage customers with their story, even if it's one they've already heard - even retelling the story is valuable in itself. Then Christian went into a bit more detail for one of his clients and why authenticity should prevail over perfectionism. He then explained the two ways of telling your story, emphasizing that the thought leadership model is a lot more flexible and doesn't penalize mistakes as harshly. We rounded off by talking about ways and strategies to get your idea out there and make sure that you're heard, both by customers in your category and your competitors as well.

We also discussed;

  • The potential effect developments of artificial intelligence
  • The failure of United Airlines' brand and the cost of mistakes in a global culture
  • Why it's important to respect the source material and the past of your business
  • Small data vs. big data
  • The rise of the "creative class" and jobs that rely on innovation and a personal approach
  • The meaning of marketing "geodes" and industry clusters

Having a reliable story to fall back on when marketing your business is important but it's by far not the only step on the long path to success. It's imperative to stay on message constantly and not lose confidence in your brand. A product is also an idea - and the focus of your marketing should be how this idea will make a customer's life easier because it can do a certain thing better than them. The other important thing to consider is your category and what it lacks because if you're not thinking about this, then somebody else is: and there can only be one category king. Finally, to stay afloat, you need to invest not just in relatable stories but also in fundamentally good stories. You need to put yourself out there and make yourself the obvious choice for customers in that niche. And last but not least - you should always be having fun too.

Guest Bio

Christian Sarkar is a marketing guru and innovator. He's the founder of Double Loop Marketing, a leading expert in mapping online social and business networks and ecosystems for competitive intelligence and market research in public and private sectors. Christian provides CEO and senior executives with the opportunity to breathe fresh life into their business. He's not afraid to challenge traditional corporate models and push companies to think outside the box as much as possible. Christopher is a trendsetter, whose inspirational work is highly praised by his clients. Read his blog at ChristianSarkar.com, learn more about Double Loop Marketing on DoubleLoopMarketing.com or follow him on Twitter at Twitter.com/ChristianSarkar.

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043: Motivation, Inspiration & Being Healthy With Guru to “Conscious Entrepreneurs”, JV Crum III

Has Western medicine failed you? Do you know how to build a successful business or podcast? In this episode, self-made millionaire J.V. Crum talks candidly about his diabetes diagnosis, how he shunned Western medicine in favour of a holistic approach, and the fantastic ways it has helped him in every avenue of his life. J.V. also discusses why he has been so successful with his daily healthcare podcasts.

I am clear about how much impact I can make with the rest of my life. I can only make that impact if I make the impact with people who are ready to make impact with their lives. – J.V. Crum

Takeaways

  1. We have been lied to by Western doctors for years telling us that we can’t heal and we’re all sick and need to be medicated.
  2. Diabetes changed J. V. Crum’s life and changed his outlook on business and who he wanted to work with, he realized he had no time for time wasters.
  3. If you want to build a great company, it’s all about having substance. Those instant fame companies will not last and everyone will have forgotten about them within a matter of years.

We began this episode with J.V. telling us about his upbringing in Florida, how his parents influenced him and how he grew to be a millionaire in his twenties. Next, he spoke openly about his diabetes and how it has completely changed his outlook on both life and business. He also shared on the holistic approach to treatment he has taken. Later in the episode we spoke about the importance of entrepreneurs and why there seem to be less and less in the millennial generation. Following on from that J.V. spoke about his love of podcasts and how he got into the area, as well as how the diabetes has changed the output of his shows.  We finished up by discussing his father’s death and his greatest fears.

J.V. also shared insights on;

  • The importance of visualization, meditation and exercise in healing.
  • How health and business are connected.
  • Prime Movers.
  • How to build a digital business successfully.
  • His training programme.

Western medicine isn’t always the best way to heal, and holistic techniques can be much more effective. Through harnessing the power that your body already possesses with things like hypnosis and visualization, and combining them with good diet and exercise you can heal yourself. J.V. is living proof of this. It is important to live your life with purpose and the only way you can truly be happy is if you look back on your last day on earth and say that you lived your life to its fullest.

Guest Bio

J.V. Crum, III, MBA, JD, MS Psychology, became a self-made millionaire entrepreneur and investor by his twenties. He is an author, speaker, coach and founder of the Conscious Millionaire Institute LLC. which trains entrepreneurs and leaders to achieve total success. His non-profit Conscious World Foundation Inc. provides community projects that support youth development. For more information head over to his website; ConsciousMillionaire.com

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